IT News - Linux

Locking down a system isn't rocket science but it's not intuitive either. Learn additional security controls that won't cost you anything but time to implement

"System lockdown doesn't have to be a big or a horrible task that strikes dread into the most jaded of sysadmin hearts," writes Ken Hess in Red Hat News.

"No, it's not intuitive or necessarily trivial to properly lock down a Linux server, but it's also not quantum physics either. In my previous article, Sysadmin security: 8 Linux lockdown controls, I covered eight essential changes that you need to make to every Linux system regardless of function. In this article, I cover more system controls that you can implement quickly and at no cost..."


Locking down a system isn't rocket science but it's not intuitive either. Learn additional security controls that won't cost you anything but time to implement

"System lockdown doesn't have to be a big or a horrible task that strikes dread into the most jaded of sysadmin hearts," writes Ken Hess in Red Hat News.

"No, it's not intuitive or necessarily trivial to properly lock down a Linux server, but it's also not quantum physics either. In my previous article, Sysadmin security: 8 Linux lockdown controls, I covered eight essential changes that you need to make to every Linux system regardless of function. In this article, I cover more system controls that you can implement quickly and at no cost..."


Linux on Windows just took a big graphical desktop step forward with Microsoft's plans for Windows Subsystem for Linux

"Linux on the desktop has had more than its fair share of troubles," opines Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols in ZDNet. "Sure, the Linux desktop has long been a favorite of top-flight developers, system administrators, and loyal fans. But, when it comes to the mass audience, Linux has only about 1% of users. One major company, however, still believes in the Linux desktop: Microsoft.

At Microsoft Build, its virtual developers' conference, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella announced that Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) 2.0 would soon support Linux GUIs and applications. Specifically, this will enable programmers to develop native and cross-platform programs with tools like GNOME Builder, KDevelop, and Emacs. Besides supporting Linux GUI programs, you'll be able to run Linux and Windows GUI applications simultaneously on the same desktop screen...."


Linux on Windows just took a big graphical desktop step forward with Microsoft's plans for Windows Subsystem for Linux

"Linux on the desktop has had more than its fair share of troubles," opines Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols in ZDNet. "Sure, the Linux desktop has long been a favorite of top-flight developers, system administrators, and loyal fans. But, when it comes to the mass audience, Linux has only about 1% of users. One major company, however, still believes in the Linux desktop: Microsoft.

At Microsoft Build, its virtual developers' conference, Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella announced that Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) 2.0 would soon support Linux GUIs and applications. Specifically, this will enable programmers to develop native and cross-platform programs with tools like GNOME Builder, KDevelop, and Emacs. Besides supporting Linux GUI programs, you'll be able to run Linux and Windows GUI applications simultaneously on the same desktop screen...."

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