IT News - CxO

Lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic can help IT leaders and managers get ready for the next emergency

"Was your IT team ready for the COVID-19 pandemic?" asks Cynthia Harvey in InformationWeek. "Could your network handle the load of all your employees using the VPN at once? Did you have the right security measures in place to support remote workers? Did your IT team have the right tools to allow them to work remotely as well?

No doubt most IT leaders found that they were well prepared in some areas -- and less well prepared in others. And if you are like most, you probably spent the first weeks of the pandemic putting out fires as your team struggled to adapt to the new reality. You may have even had to deal with layoffs or short-term furloughs..."


Lessons learned from the COVID-19 pandemic can help IT leaders and managers get ready for the next emergency

"Was your IT team ready for the COVID-19 pandemic?" asks Cynthia Harvey in InformationWeek. "Could your network handle the load of all your employees using the VPN at once? Did you have the right security measures in place to support remote workers? Did your IT team have the right tools to allow them to work remotely as well?

No doubt most IT leaders found that they were well prepared in some areas -- and less well prepared in others. And if you are like most, you probably spent the first weeks of the pandemic putting out fires as your team struggled to adapt to the new reality. You may have even had to deal with layoffs or short-term furloughs..."


Surfacing from crisis mode, CIOs find themselves redefining IT priorities, thanks to budgets in flux, a rising need to refine business processes, and new outlooks on the future of work

Stacy Collett writes in CIO, "Conn's HomePlus CIO Todd Renaud spent the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic's office shutdowns and store restrictions 'just trying to get through the next day.' One month later, he's setting his sights on what the next new normal might be, and what it will mean to the appliance retailer's IT strategy over the next year.

'I'm going to assume that our remote workforce will be a larger percent than it is today,' he says. 'How will that impact the company, assets and data? I'm thinking about the impact in our stores if we continue to have restrictions on the number of people' inside and other safety requirements. For example, Renaud is considering videoconferencing capabilities that could enable customers to virtually walk through the store with a sales rep serving as a guide to simulate an in-store sales experience..."


Surfacing from crisis mode, CIOs find themselves redefining IT priorities, thanks to budgets in flux, a rising need to refine business processes, and new outlooks on the future of work

Stacy Collett writes in CIO, "Conn's HomePlus CIO Todd Renaud spent the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic's office shutdowns and store restrictions 'just trying to get through the next day.' One month later, he's setting his sights on what the next new normal might be, and what it will mean to the appliance retailer's IT strategy over the next year.

'I'm going to assume that our remote workforce will be a larger percent than it is today,' he says. 'How will that impact the company, assets and data? I'm thinking about the impact in our stores if we continue to have restrictions on the number of people' inside and other safety requirements. For example, Renaud is considering videoconferencing capabilities that could enable customers to virtually walk through the store with a sales rep serving as a guide to simulate an in-store sales experience..."


Economic recovery will require business to work differently. CIOs may be asked to automate more and support high levels of remote working

"In a joint statement with HM Treasury, the Bank of England has unveiled plans to support businesses hit by the lockdown," reports Cliff Saran in ComputerWeekly.

"Although the magnitude of the economic shock from the Covid-19 coronavirus is highly uncertain, the Bank of England and HM Treasury warned that activity is likely to weaken in the coming months. Temporary, but significant, disruptions to supply chains and weaker activity could challenge cash flows and increase demand for working capital from companies..."


Economic recovery will require business to work differently. CIOs may be asked to automate more and support high levels of remote working

"In a joint statement with HM Treasury, the Bank of England has unveiled plans to support businesses hit by the lockdown," reports Cliff Saran in ComputerWeekly.

"Although the magnitude of the economic shock from the Covid-19 coronavirus is highly uncertain, the Bank of England and HM Treasury warned that activity is likely to weaken in the coming months. Temporary, but significant, disruptions to supply chains and weaker activity could challenge cash flows and increase demand for working capital from companies..."


Leaders in cybersecurity have more discipline for implementing strategy on a regular basis, whereas non-leaders were more likely to update their cybersecurity strategy "intermittently," according to a survey of 200 CEOs and CISOs from The Wall Street Journal Intelligence and Forcepoint

"When CISOs have the backing of their non-technical C-suite counterparts, they will likely hit their goals. But not all organizations are created equal," opines Roberto Torres in CIO Dive.

"Boards recognize they lack the necessary information to make governance decisions without disturbing innovation. The democratization of security is disrupting how businesses operate across departments, and that turmoil requires better communication..."


Leaders in cybersecurity have more discipline for implementing strategy on a regular basis, whereas non-leaders were more likely to update their cybersecurity strategy "intermittently," according to a survey of 200 CEOs and CISOs from The Wall Street Journal Intelligence and Forcepoint

"When CISOs have the backing of their non-technical C-suite counterparts, they will likely hit their goals. But not all organizations are created equal," opines Roberto Torres in CIO Dive.

"Boards recognize they lack the necessary information to make governance decisions without disturbing innovation. The democratization of security is disrupting how businesses operate across departments, and that turmoil requires better communication..."


Jim Swanson didn't expect to jump into crisis leadership mode three months into his new CIO role. But COVID-19 isn't slowing down his transformation efforts: If anything, they've accelerated

Jim Swanson writes in The Enterprisers Project, "When I stepped into the global CIO role at Johnson & Johnson last fall, I was profoundly inspired by the company's potential to positively impact human health. With an already-solid IT foundation, I was joining the world's largest healthcare company to leverage technology across Johnson & Johnson for the benefit of the patients and customers who count on us.

Little did I know that just three months into the job, the COVID-19 pandemic would change the world as we know it, and the work of IT leaders everywhere would become more important than ever before..."


Jim Swanson didn't expect to jump into crisis leadership mode three months into his new CIO role. But COVID-19 isn't slowing down his transformation efforts: If anything, they've accelerated

Jim Swanson writes in The Enterprisers Project, "When I stepped into the global CIO role at Johnson & Johnson last fall, I was profoundly inspired by the company's potential to positively impact human health. With an already-solid IT foundation, I was joining the world's largest healthcare company to leverage technology across Johnson & Johnson for the benefit of the patients and customers who count on us.

Little did I know that just three months into the job, the COVID-19 pandemic would change the world as we know it, and the work of IT leaders everywhere would become more important than ever before..."


Experience of delivering digital change in the private sector means the PPF's IT chief is well positioned to lead transformation in a critical public sector organisation

"Simon Liste, chief information technology officer (CITO) at the Pension Protection Fund (PPF), is using his experience of leading digital transformation in a range of businesses and sectors to bring change to a public sector organisation," writes Mark Samuels in ComputerWeekly.

"Set up by the Pensions Act 2004, the PPF protects millions of people throughout the UK who belong to defined-benefit pension schemes. If their employers go bust, and their pension schemes cannot afford to pay what they had promised, the PPF pays compensation for the lost pensions..."


Experience of delivering digital change in the private sector means the PPF's IT chief is well positioned to lead transformation in a critical public sector organisation

"Simon Liste, chief information technology officer (CITO) at the Pension Protection Fund (PPF), is using his experience of leading digital transformation in a range of businesses and sectors to bring change to a public sector organisation," writes Mark Samuels in ComputerWeekly.

"Set up by the Pensions Act 2004, the PPF protects millions of people throughout the UK who belong to defined-benefit pension schemes. If their employers go bust, and their pension schemes cannot afford to pay what they had promised, the PPF pays compensation for the lost pensions..."

See all Archived IT News - CxO articles See all articles from this issue